Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)

Posted 7 months ago by Wales Gene Park

The current national acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) trial in adults investigated whether a low (reduced) intensity chemotherapy regimen prior to transplant could improve the outcome of patients with ALL who are over 40 years of age. The results (60% 2 year survival) are very encouraging but patients who come to transplant with small amounts of 'residual' disease had less good outcomes. The goal of this trial is to see if a slightly stronger chemotherapy regimen (involving total body irradiation, (TBI)) can improve results by reducing the chance of the disease coming back (relapsing) without increasing the chance of not surviving the transplant. Up to 242 patients will be 'randomised' to the trial to receive either the established chemotherapy of fludarabine and melphalan or cyclophosphamide and TBI to compare the outcomes between the two treatment regimens. Other measures to reduce relapse will be the earlier use of donor white cell infusions...

 Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)

Posted 1 month ago by Wales Gene Park

Brief Summary This trial is to investigate the combination of selumetinib and dexamethasone in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in both adults and children. Phase I is to find the most suitable dose of selumetinib to safely give with dexamethasone. Phase II will use this dose to find out how well the combination works. Detailed Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer worldwide. The overall newly diagnosed ALL cure rate is approaching 90% however children with relapsed ALL often do not survive. The frequency of ALL in adults is significantly lower however more challenging to treat compared to childhood ALL. Adult ALL is more resistant to chemotherapy and patient have reduced treatment tolerance (particularly the elderly population) therefore overall survival rates are low. Therefore there is a need to develop more effective treatment which improves survival rates for this patient population. Those eligible in...

 Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) /  Birmingham


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