Ependymoma (on the brain)

Posted 1 year ago by Wales Gene Park

A trial looking at treatment for children and young adults with an ependymoma This trial is looking at chemotherapy and extra doses of radiotherapy after surgery to treat ependymoma. It is open to children and young adults with an ependymoma that hasn’t been completely removed by surgery. Cancer Research UK supports this trial. There are 2 parts to this trial. In the 1st part the trial committee looks at the results of your tests and scans. The 2nd part is looking at treatment pathways. There are 3 treatment pathways in this trial. This information is about pathway 2. We have information on pathway 1 and pathway 3. The aims of this trial are to find How well vincristine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide and high dose methotrexate works to treat ependymoma How safe the combination is What are the side effects of this combination How safe it is give 2 more doses of...

 Ependymoma (on the brain) /  England

Posted 1 year ago by Wales Gene Park

This trial is looking at treating ependymoma with chemotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy. It is open to children and young adults whose ependymoma has been completely removed by surgery. Cancer Research UK supports this trial. There are 2 parts to this trial. In the 1st part the trial committee looks at the results of your tests and scans. The 2nd part is looking at treatment pathways. There are 3 treatment pathways in this trial. This information is about pathway 1. We also have information on pathway 2 and pathway 3. The aims of this trial are to find out how well chemotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy works to stop ependymoma coming back about the side effects of having chemotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy how safe it is to give chemotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy

 Ependymoma (on the brain) /  England

Posted 1 year ago by Wales Gene Park

Ependymoma is a type of brain tumour that mostly affects children and young people. We use the term ‘you’ in this summary, but if you are a parent, we are referring to your child. Doctors usually treat ependymoma by removing it with surgery. After surgery if you can’t have radiotherapy you have chemotherapy instead. In this pathway researchers want to find out if adding a drug called valproic acid to chemotherapy improves treatment. Valproic acid is a drug that blocks substances (enzymes ) in the body called histone deacetylases (pronounced dee-as-et-isle-azes). Cells need these to grow and divide. Blocking them may stop cancer growing. Drugs that block these enzymes are called histone deacetylase inhibitors or HDAC inhibitors. We know from research that valproic acid can help people with other types of brain tumours. The aims of this pathway are to find how well chemotherapy with valproic acid works for young...

 Ependymoma (on the brain) /  Cardiff

Posted 1 year ago by Wales Gene Park

This trial is looking at treating ependymoma with chemotherapy after surgery and radiotherapy. It is open to children and young adults whose ependymoma has been completely removed by surgery. Cancer Research UK supports this trial. There are 2 parts to this trial. In the 1st part the trial committee looks at the results of your tests and scans. The 2nd part is looking at treatment pathways. There are 3 treatment pathways in this trial. This information is about pathway 1. We also have information on pathway 2 and pathway 3.

 Ependymoma (on the brain) /  Cardiff

Posted 1 year ago by Wales Gene Park

This trial is looking at adding valproic acid to chemotherapy after surgery to treat ependymoma. It is open to children younger than 1 year old and those with an ependymoma who can’t have radiotherapy after surgery to remove their tumour. Cancer Research UK supports this trial. There are 2 parts to this trial. In the 1st part the trial committee looks at the results of your tests and scans. The 2nd part is looking at treatment pathways. There are 3 treatment pathways in this trial. This information is about pathway 3. We have information on pathway 1 and pathway 2.

 Ependymoma (on the brain) /  England


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